Music

Honeymoon Album review: Falling back in love with Lana Del Rey

So… I felt a bit out of touch and ashamed of myself when Lana’s new album came out at the end of September and I hadn’t been anticipating it for weeks in advance. Truth is I have been just too wrapped up in boring “adult stuff” like endless phone calls to Council Tax advisors explaining why I shouldn’t be paying because I’m a student, and moaning about Tube prices and the generally extortionate living costs of Central London.

In fact, right now, I should actually be in a lecture. But, I’m sick with a nasty flu/cold that’s been clinging on for weeks. So I decided to rock on to a bit of Lana in bed whilst writing this review to make my life seem that little bit less of a failure. Her track “God knows I try” has struck a real chord with me whilst I hack away pitifully. Lana’s music is undeniably brilliant for when you’re feeling sorry for yourself. It’s also perfect for those lonely Friday nights contemplating the meaning of life to oneself with a bottle and something nice to smoke.

Her music has a subtle but oh so perfect erotic vibe. “Music to watch boys to” and the video has my semi lesbian crush for her back to its former glory, much like “Born to die” did back in the day.

I think part of me procrastinated listening to her latest offering, because I took a sneak peek at some of the reviews “not as good as her other albums” on the YouTube comments section (always a bad idea), and was put off. Part of me didn’t want to feel like anything Lana does could be any less than perfect, or better than what came before. I wanted to keep her Madonna like image in tact in my mind. I also wasn’t particularly grabbed by the opening interlude of “Honeymoon” and suspiciously dirgey sounding -at least at first- chorus. But Lana can even make dirges sound sexy.

Boy was I wrong.

Lana’s frank opening line: “We both know it’s not fashionable to love me” instantly had me transported to L.A; a mini movie starts playing of Lana and her forbidden love riding in Cadillacs in my mind, and her orgasmic baby doll voice starts lulling me into the chasm of her Sad core. Oh my god I love Sad core. And NO ONE does Sad Core like Lana. She basically invented it.

Lana makes me feel like she understands my pain. Although she has supermodel looks, barrel loads of talent, and now a sizeable fortune, she has this endearing misunderstood crazy girl persona that she mentions in nearly all of her songs. A vulnerable, innocent quality that makes her both love-able and relate-able, even when she’s singing about bedding rich old men and getting high on Hydroponic weed. You can still imagine being her and can envisage parallels between her and you. She’s alluring in a very subtle, soothing non-threatening way. Always understated in her videos, she opts for dainty little nighty numbers rather than corset madness à la Rihanna or Beyoncé. Lana goes for the damsel in distress vibe.

But, she’s not innocent or vulnerable at all; Lana knows exactly what she’s doing. She’s hypnotising us all with her baby doll voice and totally owning the market. She’s so niche and underrated that’s she’s basically forging her own genre of music that goes from strength to strength with each album.

And, so the magic continues with each track as I listen to the Playlist on repeat. (YouTube bitches; yes I’m cheap).

However, I am more than happy to fork out £9.99, or whatever LPs go for these days. It will be more than worth the money to have her voice echoing all over my Iphone in all its studio quality, non-pirated majesty. My favourites are “High by the beach”– the video literally puts me into a trance. “Religion” and “Freak” are an escapist’s dream, and “24” is great for those with love rat partners/exes. “Art Deco” has a pleasant beat and rhythm and Lana’s cute little lisp makes a nice debut.

Overall opinion: Honeymoon is the answer to my prayers. It’s perfect getting high/losing your mind to jam. I’m officially back in love with Lana. She has even convinced me to pop into my closest Co-op or other appropriate retailer at the soonest opportunity to bag myself a copy of the album. Which is quite an achievement since I’m skint and a staunch YouTube converter loyalist.

1 Comment
  • Cecily Wild

    A good summary quote I forgot to put into the article:

    “Born to Die was Lana’s first step into the brilliant blue lagoon of success, Ultraviolence was an experimental skinny dip, but Honeymoon is a determined breast-stroke into a horizon of endless opportunity.”

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